origami

Origami in the Classroom

Origami comes from the Japanese words “oru” which means to fold, and “kami” which means paper. In simpler terms, it means the art of folding paper. An advantage of this form of art is it doesn’t need an innate talent like that of painting, drawing, etc. With only neatness in folding and patience in following the manual’s or teacher’s instructions, you’re already a soldier ready to take part in the battle.

origami

This isn’t something new to us, as Japanese people have popularized this simple yet amazing activity. There are so many websites that offer paper folding instructions but I suggest that a book must be at hand. In that way, kids get to choose the object they want to fold. Interest is a key factor in being able to finish a task.

Origami can be very difficult for the younger ones.¬†You might often hear four-year-old kids saying, “Teacher, I don’t know how to do it. Could you help me?” or “Teacher, could you show it again to us?” Sometimes, they end up not doing the activity or getting bored and crumpling their paper. As a teacher, you should carefully choose the origami activity for your class. It should be suitable to their age and capacity.